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How to Paint a Vinyl Door Sweep

Thanks for sharing!

A few weeks ago, I shared the makeovers of our 2 exterior doors. The process included:

We’re still loving the transformation that took them from this:

white front door with no decor

To this!

a front door entrance with a square boxwood wreath, plants on the side, and a mat in front that says "hello"

But, there is one little step in the process that I haven’t shared with you yet. In fact, when we were planning this project, this step wasn’t even on the to do list. But, it quickly got there.

You see, the front door has a vinyl door sweep screwed to the bottom of the door.

I removed it to paint the door and quickly realized what an important part of the door it was…

Without it, you can see daylight, and the breeze whistles right in.

However, once the door was painted dark gray, the white door sweep looked awful!

Dark gray door with white vinyl door sweep on the bottom

Because the front of the door was going to remain white, it made no sense to go purchase a dark colored door sweep (and I’m not sure they even make them in different colors…).

So, I decided to try giving it a custom paint job. I wanted it to remain white on the front side, and “Raccoon Fur” on the back side to match the new paint color. It worked like a charm.

Here’s how to paint a vinyl door sweep a custom color:

4 inch foam roller refills and their package

Supplies needed:

  • Benjamin Moore Advance Primer (The type of primer is SO important! Make sure it is a type that sticks to the surface you are painting).
  • Paintbrush
  • Foam roller and handle
  • Paint color of choice (I used Raccoon Fur by Benjamin Moore in pearl finish)

Step 1: Remove the door sweep from the door by unscrewing it from the base of the door.

a vinyl door sweep removed from the bottom of a door

Don’t forget to put the screws away in a place you’ll remember so you can find them when it’s time to put the sweep back on the door. (Ask me how I know how important this is…;))

Step 2: Clean the sweep thoroughly with soap and water, ensuring there is no soap residue left behind.

Remember, paint doesn’t like to stick to dirt OR slippery soap!:)

Step 3: Prime the side of the door sweep that you’d like to be the custom color.

applying paint primer with a brush

In our case, I wanted to paint only the back side of the door sweep. It was easy to remember which side that was since it was the side with the screw holes.

Step 4: Once the primer has dried thoroughly, paint on the custom color.

a foam roller painting a dark gray color on a vinyl door sweep

(pardon the blurry picture…Obviously, I can’t paint with one hand and photograph with the other.;))

Since I already had my foam roller filled with paint from the front door, I tried using it on the door sweep, too. It worked really well.

Step 5: Paint as many coats as necessary ~ allowing it to dry well between coats ~ to get a good coverage of color.

This paint layered nicely and only required 2 coats.

Step 6: Once the paint is fully dry, attach the door sweep back onto the door by matching up the screws into the original holes.

Now you should have a door sweep that blends into the door color so well, you don’t even notice it!

The back of a front door painted the color Raccoon Fur by Benjamin Moore

And if the front of the door is a different color, it can blend with it, too!

White Front Door with Black Handles from Schlage

Related Posts:

How to Paint Vinyl Door Sweeps a Custom Color

 

Thanks for sharing!

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2 Comments

  1. Hi Rita Joy! {Love your middle/last name!!!} I know, sometimes you don’t even think about that piece or the weatherstripping that surrounds a door until you go to paint it. Always the perfect time to put up a new toe kick, rain and wind guard or repaint the old one, as you did. <3 Turned out great and you can't even tell it's there.

    Your door entrance looks sensational now!
    Hugs,
    Barb 🙂

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